Unintended Consequences: An Evening with Edward Conard

The Simon Graduate School of Business announces a NYC networking event for alumni and guests –

Unintended Consequences: An Evening with Edward Conard
Thursday, September 13, 2012
7:00 p.m.
Citi Executive Conference Center
601 Lexington Avenue, 13th Floor, New York, NY 10022

                                 Hosted by Simon alum, Sanjay Vatsa ’89, Managing Director, Citi

The Simon MBA/MS Admissions office is offering a limited number of complimentary passes to allow prospective full-time candidates to attend this event.  To learn more, please contact me at your earliest opportunity via email: Rebekah.Lewin@simon.rochester.edu

Ed Conard, the author of Unintended Consequences:  Why Everything You Know About the Economy is Wrong, was a partner at Bain Capital from 1993 to 2007. He served as the head of Bain’s New York office and led the firm’s acquisitions of large industrial companies. He sits on several boards of directors including the boards of Waters Corporation and Sensata Technologies. Prior to Bain, Conard worked for Wasserstein Perella, an investment bank that specialized in mergers and acquisitions, and Bain & Company, a management consulting firm, where he headed its industrial practice. He is a graduate of Harvard Business School and the University of Michigan.

In the aftermath of the Financial Crisis, many commonly held beliefs have emerged to explain its cause. Conventional wisdom blames Wall Street and the mortgage industry for using low down payments, teaser rates, and other predatory tactics to seduce unsuspecting home owners into assuming mortgages they couldn’t afford. It blames average Americans for borrowing recklessly and spending too much. And it blames the tax policies and deregulatory environment of the Reagan and Bush administrations for encouraging reckless risk-taking by wealthy individuals and financial institutions.  But according to Unintended Consequences, the conventional wisdom masks the real causes of our economic disruption and puts us at risk of facing a slew of unintended—and potentially dangerous—consequences.  In an attempt to set the record straight and fill the void left by other analysts, Conard presents a fascinating and contrarian case for how the economy really works, what went wrong over the past decade, and what steps we can take to start growing again.

 

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